Sprayed-Foam and
Foamed-In-Place Insulation

Liquid foam insulation materials can be sprayed, foamed-in-place, injected, or poured. Their ability to fill even the smallest cavities gives them twice the R-value per inch than traditional batt insulation.

Types of Liquid Foam Insulation

Today, some foam insulation consists of materials similar to those found in pillows and mattresses. Also, most foam materials can now be used with foaming agents that don't use chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) or hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), which are harmful to the earth's ozone layer.

Some types of available liquid foam insulation materials include cementitious, phenolic, polyisocyanurate, and olyurethane.

Cementitious

Cementitious insulation material is a cement-based foam used as sprayed-foam or foamed-in-placed insulation.

One type of cementitious, spray-foam insulation is known as Air-Krete™. It contains magnesium silicate and has an R-value of about 3.9 per inch. With an initial consistency similar to shaving cream, Air-Krete™ is pumped into closed cavities. After curing, it's similar to a thick pudding.

Cementitious foam costs about as much as polyurethane foam. It's also nontoxic and nonflammable. Cementitious foam is made from minerals (like magnesium oxide) extracted from seawater.

Phenolic

Phenolic (phenol-formaldehyde) foam was somewhat popular years ago as rigid foam board insulation. It is currently available only as a foamed-in-place insulation.

Phenolic foamed-in-place insulation has a R-4.8 value per inch of thickness and uses air as the foaming agent. One major disadvantage of phenolic foam is that it can shrink up to 2% after curing. This shrinkage makes it less popular today.

Polyisocyanurate

Polyisocyanurate or polyiso is a thermosetting type of plastic, closed-cell foam that contains a low-conductivity gas (usually hydrochlorofluorocarbons or HCFC) in its cells. The high thermal resistance of the gas gives polyisocyanurate insulation materials an R-value typically from R-5.6 to R-8 per inch.

Polyisocyanurate insulation is available as a liquid, sprayed foam, and rigid foam board. It can also be made into laminated insulation panels with a variety of facings. Foamed-in-place applications of polyisocyanurate insulation are usually cheaper than installing foam boards. They also usually perform better since the liquid foam molds itself to all of the surfaces.

Over time, the R-value of polyisocyanurate insulation can drop as some of the low-conductivity gas escapes and air replaces it. This phenomenon is known as thermal drift. Experimental data indicates that most thermal drift occurs within the first two years after the insulation material is manufactured. The R-value then slowly decreases. For example, if the insulation has an initial R-value of R-9 per inch, it will probably eventually drop to R-7 per inch. The R-value then remains unchanged unless the foam is damaged.

Foil and plastic facings on rigid, polyisocyanurate foam panels can help stabilize the R-value. Testing suggests that the stabilized R-value of rigid foam with metal foil facings remains unchanged after 10 years. Reflective foil, if installed correctly, can also act as a radiant barrier, which adds another R-2 to the overall thermal resistance. Panels with foil facings have stabilized R-values of R-7.1 to R-8.7 per inch.

Polyurethane

Polyurethane is a closed-cell foam insulation material that contains a low-conductivity gas (usually hydrochlorofluorocarbons or HCFC) in its cells. The high thermal resistance of the gas gives polyurethane insulation materials an R-value typically around R-7 to R-8 per inch.

Over time, the R-value of polyurethane insulation can drop as some of the low-conductivity gas escapes and air replaces it. This phenomenon is known as thermal drift. Experimental data indicates that most thermal drift occurs within the first two years after the insulation material is manufactured. The R-value then slowly decreases. For example, if the insulation has an initial R-value of R-9 per inch, it will probably eventually drop to R-7 per inch. The R-value then remains unchanged unless the foam is damaged.

Polyurethane insulation is available as a liquid sprayed foam and rigid foam board. It can also be made into laminated insulation panels with a variety of facings

Sprayed-Foam Polyurethane Insulation

Sprayed or foamed-in-place applications of polyurethane insulation are usually cheaper than installing foam boards. These applications also usually perform better since the liquid foam molds itself to all of the surfaces.

All closed-cell polyurethane foam insulation made today is produced with a non-CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) gas as the foaming agent. Some polyurethane foam combines with a HCFC gas. These types don't insulate as well as insulation made with a CFC gas, but the non-CFC gas is less destructive to the ozone layer. However, these foams still have an aged R-6.5 per inch thickness. Their density is generally 2.0 lb/ft3 (32.0 kilograms per cubic meter [kg/m3]). There also are low-density open-cell polyurethane foams (0.5 lb/ft3 [8 kg/m3]). These foams are similar to conventional polyurethane foams, but are more flexible. Some low-density varieties use carbon dioxide (CO2) as the foaming agent.

Low-density foams are sprayed into open wall cavities and rapidly expand to seal and fill the cavity. One manufacturer offers a slow-expanding foam, which is intended for cavities in existing homes. The liquid foam expands very slowly and thus reduces the chance of damaging the wall from overexpansion. The foam is water-vapor permeable, remains flexible, and is resistant to wicking of moisture. It provides good air sealing and yields about R-3.6 per inch of thickness. It is also fire resistant and won't sustain a flame.

Soy-based, polyurethane liquid spray-foam products are also available. The cured R-value is around 3.7 per inch. These products can be applied with the same equipment used for petroleum-based polyurethane foam products.


Rigid Polyurethane Foam Board Insulation

Foil and plastic facings on rigid, polyurethane foam panels can help stabilize the R-value, preventing thermal drift. Testing suggests that the stabilized R-value of rigid foam with metal foil facings remains unchanged after 10 years. Reflective foil, if installed correctly, can also act as a radiant barrier, which adds another R-2 to the overall thermal resistance. Panels with foil facings have stabilized R-values of R-7.1 to R-8.7 per inch.

Other Types

Some less common types include Icynene foam and Tripolymer foam. Icynene foam can be either sprayed or injected, which makes it the most versatile. It also has good resistance to both air and water intrusion. Tripolymer foam—a water-soluble foam—is injected into wall cavities. It has excellent resistance to fire and air intrusion.

Urea-formaldehyde (UF) foam was used in homes during the 1970s and early 1980s. It is no longer available for residential use because of health-related concerns.

Installation

Liquid foam insulation—combined with a foaming agent—can be applied using small spray containers or in larger quantities as a pressure-sprayed (foamed-in-place) product. Both types expand and harden as the mixture cures. They also conform to the shape of the cavity, filling and sealing it thoroughly.

Slow-curing liquid foams are also available. These foams are designed to flow over obstructions before expanding and curing, and they are often used for empty wall cavities in existing buildings. There are also liquid foam materials that can be poured from a container.

Installation of most types of liquid foam insulation requires special equipment and certification. Therefore, you'll probably want a certified insulation installer to do it.

Following installation, an approved thermal barrier—such as drywall—must cover all foam materials. Also, some building codes don't recognize sprayed foam insulation as a vapor barrier, so installation might require an additional air barrier, like polyethylene or some other vapor retarder.

Costs

Liquid foam insulation products and installation usually cost more than traditional batt insulation. However, liquid foam insulation also forms an air barrier. This can help eliminate some of the other costs and tasks associated with weatherizing a home, such as caulking, applying housewrap and vapor barrier, and taping joints. When building a new home, this type of insulation can also help reduce construction time and the number of specialized contractors, which saves money.

Original art, design & content © Heatboard. The Internet Energy Archive. All Rights Reserved.
Custom Search